Quantum Matter Theory
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Quantum Matter Theory

Quantum Matter Theory

In the quantum world, systems of many particles can organize themselves into highly entangled states, whose properties transcend those of the individual constituents. Especially fascinating is the emergence of topological order, an unconventional way of quantum organization that contradicts the traditional paradigms of condensed matter physics. Topological states of matter obey emergent global rules, which are dramatically different from the fundamental laws governing the microscopic individuals. For instance, a system of bosonic or fermionic particles forming a topological state can generate excitations that are neither bosons nor fermions, but anyons with novel braiding statistics. Our understanding of how topological order emerges from the microscopic degrees of freedom is far from complete. Especially intriguing is the formation of non-Abelian topological phases, where quasiparticles with non-Abelian braiding statistics arise. Beyond their fundamental importance, non-Abelian anyons hold the promise to revolutionize quantum technology, for their topological properties could be used to encode and process information in a manner resistant to errors. In the Quantum Matter Theory group we work towards the theoretical comprehension of many-body quantum entanglement. We are especially interested in deepening our understanding of topological phases and anyons. To this aim we explore novel physical mechanisms leading to the emergence of topological order from the microscopic quantum individuals.